Scott Aubrey, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor: TESOL

Scott Aubrey received his Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from the University of Auckland in 2016. He has taught at language schools and universities in Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.  Scott’s research and teaching interests include L2 motivation, the role of inter-cultural contact (inside and outside the classroom) in language learning, task-based language teaching, and L2 writing instruction. His published work includes articles in leading journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Language Teaching Research, and The Modern Language Journal. Scott currently lives in Hong Kong and teaches courses in English language education at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. 

Associate Professor: TESOL

Natsuko Shintani,  Ph.D.Natsuko Shintani, Ph.D.

Natsuko Shintani obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Auckland in 2011. She has worked as a language teacher in Japan and New Zealand, including in her own private language school for children. Her research interests include task-based language instruction, the role of interaction in second language acquisition and written corrective feedback. She has also worked on several meta-analysis studies of form-focused instruction. She has published widely in leading journals and is currently working on a single-authored book, The Role of Input-Based Tasks in Foreign Language Instruction for Young Learners, to be published by John Benjamins.

Dr. Julie Sykes Julie Sykes, Ph.D.

Associate Professor: TESOL

Julie Sykes earned her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota with a focus on applied linguistics and second language acquisition. Julie’s research focuses on the use of digital technologies for language acquisition with a specific focus on inter-language pragmatic development and intercultural competence. She has taught courses on second language teaching and learning methodology and research, language learning and technology, Hispanic linguistics, and inter-language pragmatic development. Julie’s experience includes the design, implementation, and evaluation of online immersive spaces and the creation of place-based, augmented-reality mobile games to engage language learners in a variety of non-institutional contexts. She has published various articles on CALL-related topics, including synchronous computer-mediated communication and pragmatic development, gaming and CALL, and lexical acquisition in digitally mediated environments. Julie serves as the UO Scholar-in-Residence and also holds a faculty appointment in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.